internet dating advantages - Df command not updating

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/xvda2 101471352 97968944 0 100% / /dev/xvda1 101086 27568 68299 29% /boot tmpfs 2097152 0 2097152 0% /dev/shm /dev/xvdc1 154816488 101374388 45577884 69% /backup /usr/tmp DSK 495844 10858 459386 3% /tmp Edit This is what i got after running df -ih Filesystem Inodes IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on /dev/xvda2 25M 652K 25M 3% / /dev/xvda1 26K 55 26K 1% /boot tmpfs 512K 1 512K 1% /dev/shm /dev/xvdc1 19M 497K 19M 3% /backup /usr/tmp DSK 126K 294 125K 1% /tmp Why df command still showing 100% disk used at dev/xvda2?Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/xvda2 101471352 97968944 0 100% / /dev/xvda1 101086 27568 68299 29% /boot tmpfs 2097152 0 2097152 0% /dev/shm /dev/xvdc1 154816488 101374388 45577884 69% /backup /usr/tmp DSK 495844 10858 459386 3% /tmp This is what i got after running df -ih Filesystem Inodes IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on /dev/xvda2 25M 652K 25M 3% / /dev/xvda1 26K 55 26K 1% /boot tmpfs 512K 1 512K 1% /dev/shm /dev/xvdc1 19M 497K 19M 3% /backup /usr/tmp DSK 126K 294 125K 1% /tmpusually when this happens, it means some open process is still locking the sector on the disk.

df command not updating-74

Df command not updating Sxse fams chat

Note that if the system should crash without the process closing the file then the file data will still be present but unreferenced, an fsck(8) run will be needed to recover the filesystem space.

Processes holding files open is one reason why the newsyslog(8) command sends signals to syslogd or other logging programs to inform them they should close and re-open their log files after it has rotated them.

If nothing else helps reboot." id="ctl00_m_m_i_ctl00_gr_ctl09_bestanswerbody" class="textarea-bestanswerhidden" name="bestanswerbody" answerbody Id="1679134" / fuser command is your best bet. Under Solaris 2.6 and later, files which have been unlinked can Still be accessed through the /proc interface. You can use LSOF (ftp://ftp.cerias.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/sysutil s/lsof) to find which processes are holding open a particular file.

try fuser -cu to look at what processes are writhing to the fs. I have also heard that lsof can be of help, not sure though. If a process is holding open a file, and that file is removed, the space belonging to the file is not freed until the process either exits or closes the file. This often happens in /var/log or /var/adm when a long-running process (e.g. If a process is holding Open such a file for writing, but it's inconvenient or impractical to Kill the process or get it to close the file, you can free up the disk space by truncating (not removing) the file from under /proc; e.g., # cd /proc/1234/fd # ls -l c--------- 1 root 24, 12 Jan 1 0 c--------- 1 root 24, 12 Jan 1 1 c--------- 1 root 24, 12 Jan 1 2 --w------- 1 root 314159265 Jan 1 3 # : 3 # ls -l c--------- 1 root 24, 12 Jan 1 0 c--------- 1 root 24, 12 Jan 1 1 c--------- 1 root 24, 12 Jan 1 2 --w------- 1 root 0 Jan 1 3 If you have any problem with cluster based system just replay... Under Solaris 2.6 and later, files which have been unlinked can Still be accessed through the /proc interface.

As per previouse messages in this archive you will have to stop the process that has a open handle on the file. Also, if I reboot, and this problem occurs again, what then?

Try stopping your applications and seeing if that releases the space. " id="ctl00_m_m_i_ctl00_gr_ctl17_bestanswerbody" class="textarea-bestanswerhidden" name="bestanswerbody" answerbody Id="1377407" /aithough the files are deleted the space is not released for the OS.

easy fix if you don't know what file is being used, is to reboot the server/virtual machine and the lock will go away.

example: main drive shows 100 % disk space used i check what is going on and i notice that the mysql slow log takes all that big space.

When a file is deleted with the rm(1) command only the reference count is decreased. the file has other directory entries due to symlinks) then the underlying file data is not removed.

Tags: , ,